from Kalama sutra, translation from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi

This blog included. "So, as I said, Kalamas: 'Don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, "This contemplative is our teacher." When you know for yourselves that, "These qualities are unskillful; these qualities are blameworthy; these qualities are criticized by the wise; these qualities, when adopted & carried out, lead to harm & to suffering" — then you should abandon them.' Thus was it said. And in reference to this was it said.

"Now, Kalamas, don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, 'This contemplative is our teacher.' When you know for yourselves that, 'These qualities are skillful; these qualities are blameless; these qualities are praised by the wise; these qualities, when adopted & carried out, lead to welfare & to happiness' — then you should enter & remain in them. Buddha - Kalama Sutta

Thursday, 30 September 2010

A short, vigorous evening practice.



So you have your main morning asana practice, no doubt followed by either some pranayama and meditation or perhaps a long savasana. Currently mine tends to be 90-120 minutes of Ashtanga Intermediate with a Vinyasa Krama Approach. I follow that with half an hour of pranayama and meditation.





On the Vinyasa Krama TT course this summer we would have a pranayama/mantra meditation class in the late afternoon. Ramaswami was very keen to stress a triadic approach to practice, so we would do fifteen minutes of Asana followed by thirty to forty minutes of pranayama and fifteen to twenty minutes of Mantra meditation ( we would do pratyahara too but for some reason that doesn't get counted, triadic sounds better).


We were given the freedom to choose which asana we wanted to do in the afternoon class, this was great as you would have twenty students just getting on with their own choice of practice. I experimented to see what worked best as a lead in to the pranayama. One day I would try a calming tadasana sequences, another day headstands, and another arm balances. Given that we only had fifteen- twenty minutes and I wanted to burn off some rajas a vigorous practice seemed called for, I think I remember Ramaswami suggesting a short vigorous practice too somewhere, but don't quote me.

In the end I settled on a few Sun salutations, some hip openers and arm balances, perhaps a daily rotating subroutine. Time being short you want to combine as much as you can and have a bit of fun with it. So I was delighted to come across this video from Yuya yesterday. I'd seen the picture of Matthew Sweeney in parsva Dandasana in his book but could never work out how he got into it. Here's Yuya showing us how.



I love it because it's a hip opener AND an arm balance. Here's my, very much, work in progress.


Another thing I like about it is what it shows up. I've always known my back needs to be straighter but check out my head. I'm trying to keep it up here but it's still bent down and turned to the side, compare that with Yuya's, he also does a little dip at the end that brings the pointed leg up higher.

More work needed.

1 comment:

  1. Wow, that background in his video looks like a movie set, AND it seems real, like he is really in a boat, what a wonderful video.... oh, and yes, of course, about the pose, very challenging!! you go! like it also that it is a hip opener, i would have not thought it on first look but then again, yes now I see it... what an interesting asana!

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