Thursday, 26 April 2012

Krishnamacharya's Primary and Middle sequence practice sheets from Yogasanagalu (1941 )





Many many thanks to Satya Murthy for the continuing translation.

Krishnamacharya wrote his book Yoga Makaranda in 1934 in the Kannada language, the Tamil edition was published in 1938. 

Krishnamacharya's Yogasanagalu was first published in the Kannada language in 1941, the 3rd edition was published in 1972 


K. Pattabhi Jois wrote his book, Yoga Mālā, in Kannada in 1958, and it was published in 1962, but was not published in English until 1999

This, along with Krishnamacharya's other book Yoga Makaranda (downloadable HERE), was originally written in Mysore while Krishnamacharya was teaching at the Mysore Palace and while Sri K Pattabhi Jois was his student.




Introduction to his 1st, 2nd and 3rd editions can be found HERE

The translation thus far brought together in a single post (this will live in the sidebar over on the left of my blog above the free download section).


* Apologies for the inconsistency of the pictures in the practice sheets. I wanted to make up something to explore the sequences in my own practice and these are mostly pictures I already had on file, hopefully they give a better idea of the sequences than the list of asana.



4 comments:

  1. Really interesting to watch the photos. badkonasana and upavishta at the ending ha? different, I can see it happening though

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  2. Grim, are you jumping back and through to new asana in this krama, or are you moving right from one asana to the next?

    Nice to see the visual representation.

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  3. Yes, curious, clearly an order of sorts here, though I still like to think of it as signposts, Ramaswami talked about Mahamudra and badha konasana at the end as a lead in to .pranayama . I'll get a better feel for it when I actually practice it, once my leg heals up.

    Good question anon, these sheets are just a visual representation of the list with pictures from my files, made it up so I could use it to practice with.

    Satya's says he doesn't find mention of the jump through etc but I'd be tempted to bring in Yoga Makaranda which did include jumping in and out of the postures. It will be interesting to see what the vinyasa count is on paschimottanasana say or one of the other seated postures to see if it matches up with Makaranda thus implying a jump through.

    I'd be tempted to jump in and out of the different mini subroutines rather than after every posture or side.

    Lots to explore.

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from Kalama sutra, translation from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi

from Kalama sutra, translation from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi This blog included. "So, as I said, Kalamas: 'Don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, "This contemplative is our teacher." When you know for yourselves that, "These qualities are unskillful; these qualities are blameworthy; these qualities are criticized by the wise; these qualities, when adopted & carried out, lead to harm & to suffering" — then you should abandon them.' Thus was it said. And in reference to this was it said.

"Now, Kalamas, don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, 'This contemplative is our teacher.' When you know for yourselves that, 'These qualities are skillful; these qualities are blameless; these qualities are praised by the wise; these qualities, when adopted & carried out, lead to welfare & to happiness' — then you should enter & remain in them. Buddha - Kalama Sutta