This blog is essentially 'sleeping'.

I've deleted or returned to draft 80% of the blog, gone are most, if not all, of the videos I posted of Pattabhi Jois, gone are most of the posts regarding my own practice as well as most of my practice videos in YouTube, other than those linked to my Vinyasa Yoga Practice Book).

Mostly I've just retained the 'Research' posts, those relating to Krishnamacharya in particular.

Blog Comments are turned off, there are no "members" of this blog .

Ashtanga History

A new page bringing together some of the posts I've put up on and related to Ashtanga history over the last couple of years. Those on Krishnamacharya I've tried to confine to the period he was in Mysore and teaching the Young Pattabhi Jois.

Below is the most recent post on the 'Original Ashtanga syllabus' and this is followed by forty or so links to my other posts.

I want to stress here Karens Caveat,

"this is just my interpretation".

I'm no no historian, no expert by any means, just a curious amateur

------------------


Krishanamacharya. The Teacher's Teacher
from Paul Harvey's Centre for Yoga Studies

Śrī T Krishnamacharya – The Source


Picture courtesy of KYM Archives
Click the links for pages in Dharma Downloads and cYs Journal to view or download Articles, Interviews and Videos around the life and work of T Krishnamacharya, TKV Desikachar, Srivatsa Ramaswami and other students.
Śrī Tirumalai Krishnamacharya was one of India’s most respected authorities on the Vedic tradition and Yoga Teachings and practice.
He was born in Karnataka State in South India on November 18th 1888 and belonged to a family of distinguished ancestry. Among his forebears was the 9th century teacher and sage Nathamuni. Śrī Nathamuni was a great Teacher who created remarkable works, such as the Nyaya Tattva.
T Krishnamacharya began his formal education at the age of six, at the Parakala Math in Mysore. His first Yoga teacher was his father until his untimely death. His next recorded teacher was Śrī Babu Bhagwan Das. His thirst for knowledge gave him the opportunity to travel widely and seek all aspects of the Vedic tradition from the best teachers across India. His formal education, largely in Sanskrit, included degrees from several universities in North India.
He in turn studied and mastered these systems and was bestowed with titles such as Samkhya Yoga Sikhamani, Mimamsa Tirtha, Nyayacarya, Vedanta Vagisa and Veda Kesari. He was also a master of Ayurveda (the ancient Indian system of healing) and Sanskrit.
At the age of twenty-eight, he trekked over 200 miles to Lake Manosarovar at the foot of Mt. Kailash in the Himalayas in Western Tibet, to learn Yoga from Ram Mohana Brahmacari. He stayed for over seven years returning on his teacher’s instructions to South India to teach. Being a master in many subjects, Krishnamacharya was offered high scholastic positions in great institutes of learning. Instead he chose to be a Yoga teacher to fulfil the promise he made to his own teacher in Tibet. Eventually he came to establish a school of yoga in the palace of the Maharajah of Mysore.
On many occasions he demonstrated the great potentials of yoga in different areas of health and self-control over oneself. The most prominent among them was being able to stop the heart beat for more than two minutes, using yogic practices. With his vast learning in yoga as well as other systems of Indian Philosophy, he emphasized that the practice of yoga must be adapted to the individual, and not the individual to yoga. This was probably one of his most significant contributions in the field of health and healing through yoga. Some of his early students, such as Pattabhi JoisBKS Iyengar and the lateIndra Devi, became renowned teachers themselves.
After Independence and the closing of the school he moved to Madras where he became wellknown for his therapeutic use of yoga. He was married (in 1925 to BKS Iyengar’s sister Namagririammal) and had six children, sons TK Srinivasan, TKV Desikachar, TK Sribhashyam and daughters Srimathi Pundarikavalli, Srimathi T Alamelu Sheshadri and Srimathi Shubha Mohan Kumar.
Śrī Krishnamacharya is now recognised the world over as an accomplished exponent of Yoga, and a major influence in shaping what we see as Yoga in the West. He was also a visionary who had a sense of the atrophy that Vedic study would face in modern times. He made it his lifetime work to nurture Vedic culture by teaching Yoga, Sanskrit and the Vedas, to one and all who sought him. Tracing the genesis of Vedavani, a center for teaching Vedic chanting, which was inaugurated in 1999 under the auspices of the Krishnamacharya Yoga Mandiram, TKV Desikachar linked its roots to his father’s conviction that teaching of the Vedas had to be kept alive at all costs.
Undaunted by the criticism that the Vedas cannot be chanted by everyone, he taught the Vedas, on the authority of the scriptures that such stringent regulations could be set aside at times when there was threat to dharma (Apadkala), which was true of this age. Even though it may not be possible to follow the same system of teaching in such an institution, it was more important to retain the spirit of the tradition, said Desikachar, in an address at the inaugural function of Vedavani, a centre established solely to teach Vedic Chanting.
His death in 1989, at the age of 100, marked the passing of a great sage and teacher.
Click the links for pages in Dharma Downloads and cYs Journal to view or download Articles, Interviews and Videos around the life and work of T Krishnamacharya, TKV Desikachar and their students.

Category Archives: Material around Krishnamacharya

Krishnamacharya answers his students……

Questions to and Responses from T Krishnamacharya - KYM Darśanam - May 1994

Independent Spirit

Interview with TKV Desikachar - by Fit Yoga Magazine April 2008

The King and the Young Man

Article about T Krishnamacharya - Translated by Bert Franklin with S Venkataraman

My Father’s Yoga

Article about T Krishnamacharya - Lecture by TKV Desikachar 1988

TKV Desikachar A Tribute

Downloadable Book on Krishnamacharya's son - Publication by the Krishnamacharya Yoga Mandiram

About Sri T Krishnamacharya, my Guru

Article by S Ramaswami - Published whilst he was trustee of the KYM

My Studies with Sri Krishnamacharya

Courtesy of Namarupa Magazine - Article by S Ramaswami

3 Gurus 48 Questions

Courtesy of Namarupa Magazine - Interviews by R Alexander Medin

Masters in Focus

Courtesy of Namarupa Magazine - An interview with Kausthub Desikachar by Rachael Stark

Meeting Krishnmacharya

Article about meeting T Krishnamacharya - From The Viniyoga Letter 1989 by Sonia Nelson



In 1937 "Guruji was teaching a 4 year course in yoga... the same course outline (1974) that you received from Nancy" Eddie Sterne

You can ignore my gloss on this topic and jump below the second line to Eddie Stern's quotes on how Pattabhi Jois developed the Ashtanga Sequences we practice now for a college course in 1937, and how that seems to show up in the 1974 syllabus given to Nancy Gilgoff and David Williams and make up your own minds as to what that may or may not suggest.

Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

--------------------

Tradition, linage, what constitutes these? We like to think of our practice as a traditional practice passed along faithfully through the lineage, unchanging, solid, dependable. We practice this way because the practice has always been this way.

Or is it that the practice has grown and developed through the lineage, each great teacher adding to the practice just as it has been added to and developed by each succeeding generation, the standing on the shoulders of giants idea.

What is traditional about our practice?

We know there have been some small changes to the sequence that have come up over the years. We have Sharath's presentation, in his recent book, on the Primary series as it's practiced now in Mysore and we have the 'syllabus' presented to Nancy Gilgoff and David Williams back in 1974. We can see some small differences here and there, nothing earth shattering and we have stories concerning how some of those changes came about.

We can see the approach to the breath may have changed somewhat. Krishnamacharya mentions Kumbhaka (breath retention) within asana in his 1934 book Yoga Makaranda but no mention of Kumbhaka in Paatbhi Jois' Yoga Mala from the 1950's. The breath seems to have been long and slow and full. Nowadays it seems to be practiced short, less full and quick, Sharath mentions a 2 second inhalation and 2 second exhalation as an example in his recent book. Pattabhi Jois would mention 10-15 second inhalation and the same for exhalation in interviews. We can only guess at what Krishnamacharya intended by 'Long, slow, full breathing... like the pouring of wine'

Drishti seems to have been a simpler affair, three or four drishti points referred to in Krishnamacharya and early Jois, now we have, what, nine?

Krishnamacharya 'talks of drawing the belly in fully in uddiyana bandha, almost a kriya, it's a much more gentle uddiyana in current practice.

But this is Ashtanga practice, Patanjali yoga, eight limbs. Krishnamacharya would stress the yama niyamas he would teach asana but also pratyahara, pranayama, meditation practices. The approach to asana may have changed somewhat but surely the other limbs are still an essential aspect of practice.

Unfortunately the other limbs seem to fade into the background. Sharath sees the need to constantly stress the importance of the yama/niyamas, we seem happy to forget about them altogether.

Pranayama is mostly taught officially only to those who have an established second series but how many of them practice it as diligently as they practice their asana. However,  the approach to the breath in the asana practice may be considered good preparation for pranayama  for when we are ready to explore it.

Pratyahara has become subsumed somewhat in the asana practice itself, into the drishti and bandha focus. That's actually an excellent approach to pratyahara perhaps, quite powerful, but surely a preparation for pratyahara rather than pratyahara itself.

Mediatation practice too, the approach to asana we take is an excellent concentration exercise, the fixed sequence, the same asana every day, the drishti and bandha focus. But again this is preparation for seated concentration practice when nothing else is going on rather than a substitute.

Where then is the tradition, the lineage?

Is it in the sequence itself, are the sequences essentially timeless?

We don't find a fixed sequence in Krishnamacharya's Yoga Makaranda and only a loose division of asana into Primary, middle and Proficient asana in Krishnamacharya's later work Yogasanagalu (1941). Krishnamacharya seems to have wanted to keep the approach to asana flexible so as to make it adaptable to the individual students needs, he seems to have resisted a fixed sequence although his listing of primary and Middle groups of asana in Yogasanagalu ( see table below) are very close to the Primary and Second series we practice now in Ashtanga.







In an email from Eddie Sterne yesterday he mentioned how Pattabhi Jois had divided up Krishnamacharya's 'Mountain of asana' (supposedly Jois' expression) into four 'series' one for each of the four years of the course he was teaching in 1937. This it seems to correspond with the 'Syllabus' he passed to Nancy and David Williams in 1971. This suggests then that the Ashtanga sequence we think of as traditional, passed along the lineage is new, a little over 70 years old. the division into six series rather than four even more recent, what, thirty years old? Eddie also mentioned in an earlier email to me how Pattabhi Jois had taken this sequence to Krishnamacharya and his teacher had approved of the division for the college syllabus, the pedagogical requirements.

A few years later however in 1941 we still find Krishnamacharya presenting a loose grouping of asana rather than pattabhi Jois, syllabus (Yogasanagalu table above).

This perhaps suggests the 'on the shoulder of giants ' idea of tradition, Pattabhi Jois building on the teaching of Krishnamacharya.

But is there anything that has passed intact from teacher to student, passed down through the ages, the old idea of tradition as something unchanging passed along the lineage.

Perhaps we can find comfort in the idea of Vinyasa, the linking of breath to movement, we find that in Pattabhi Jois and well as in Desikachar, Mohan, Ramaswami.

Krishnamacharya taught Pattabhi Jois the vinyasa approach, the linking of the breath to the movement, each movement linked to the inhalation or exhalation but did Krishnamacharya receive that from his teacher Yogeshwara Ramamohana Brahmachari up there in the Himalayas in the 1920's?

The argument goes that because we only find that vinyasa approach in Krishnamacharya's teaching then it must have been something he developed himself just as Pattabhi Jois developed the sequence we practice now. Surely, the argument continues, Brahmachari  would have taught Vinyasa to other students, we would find other examples of it.

We shall never know perhaps, it may be that Brahmacharya only taught one student this approach, he was supposedly better known for his teaching of the Yoga Sutras, perhaps no other student stayed long enough to learn his vinyasa approach to asana.

Although we may ask, did Krishnamacharya receive the interpretation of yoga sutras  II-47 below from Brahmachari  with it's stress on the importance of breath

Yoga Sutra II-47
“प्रायत्नशैथिल्यानन्तसमापत्तिभ्याम्”
prayatnashithilyanantasamapattibhyam

"prayatna - effort (of life which is breathing)

saithilya - smooth (make it smooth)

ananta-samapattibhyam:

          ananta -breath

          samapattibhyam - focusing on it

 By making the breath smooth (and long), and by concentration or focussing the mind on the breath, the perfection of the posture is obtained".

Does any of this matter. I used to think that it does, I spent a lot of time mulling over these questions. Recently somebody raised them again in comments, asking detailed questions concerning each point of difference between Krishnamacharya and Pattabhi Jois and how Pattabhi Jois' own presentation has changed. These questions should be asked, it's wrong to suggest this is an unchanging practice, that there are correct and incorrect approaches to practice (some perhaps if not 'incorrect' then foolhardy approaches), that we would be going against the lineage, the tradition if we adapt, adjust, add to or take away anything from the practice.

We should be asking these questions at some point of our practice, if only so we can discover what is essential in our practice. Besides it probably comes under Svadhyata; Self-Study

"4. Svadhyata; Self-Study
Svadhyaya means self studying what we have learned from our teacher; not only trying to understand what has been said, but deepening that understanding and expanding our knowledge by reading manuscripts and thinking more about the subject we are learning. Self-study is to engage our mind to further our studies. It is our duty to do our homework, to do and review what the guru has said, to go deeper into whatever yoga subject we are learning and in understanding and experiencing the self and the devine. The teacher cannot push, he or she can only guide. If he or she shares who Ganapati is, the remover of obstacles, it is up to the student to find out more about Ganapati and those obstacles".
Ashtanga yoga Anusthana - R. Sharath Jois

Truth be told these little differences seem to matter to me less and less. There is something special about this practice, about this discipline, the sequence reminds me of the kata I used to practice in Aikido and Iaido. It's a good addition to the tradition, adds more than it subtracts, elevates the practice somewhat. It's unique.

The fixed sequences we have now, although we may take a flexible approach to them when necessary, seem to aid discipline, aid concentration, give greater preparation. Its' an excellent tool, something we can take forward as we develop other aspects of our practice of yoga as we explore, when we feel ready, the other limbs of Ashtanga.

And perhaps what is most traditional, what has remained most unchanged and passed through generations of teachers is the attitude of dedication and devotion (some might add surrender ) that we bring to the practice, the commitment to practicing everyday, to overcoming the self and the myriad reasons the self comes up with (seeking to defend it's existence) for not practicing for not choosing yoga.


---------------------

Below are the quotes from Eddie Sterne regarding how Pattabhi Jois (Guruji) developed the Sequences we have now for the College syllabus and below the quotes the Syllabus as presented to Nancy Gilgoff and David Williams in 1974.

"In regards to timing, Guruji did begin teaching at the Pathashala in 1937. I have mentioned to people on several occasions to keep in mind that Guruji was teaching a 4 year course in yoga at the college - the same course outline that you received from Nancy. When you teach in a university, what do you have to do? Follow a curriculum. And that is what Guruji put together, and why he made an order out of what he learned from K. I am sure the ordering he made did not involve drastic changes - it probably just entailed making some divisions based on length of a sequence and general groupings of asanas. But, he did indeed make them - and the reason was to fit into the university style of teaching. Notice at the end of each year there are books listed that the student should have studied, and Sanskrit manuals are included in each year". Eddie Sterne

"... after Guruji went to teach at the College, he divided them up, and went to Krishnamacharya to seek his approval for the divisions, and Krishnam. agreed that they were good in that order".

The 'Original' Ashtanga yoga Syllabus given to Nancy Gilgoff and David Williams by Sri K Pattabhi Jois in 1974 Mysore

"In fact, David and I had no idea that there were two separate series until the end of that first four-month trip, when we were leaving, at which point Guruji gave us a sheet of paper with a list of the postures, which were listed as Primary, Intermediate, Advanced A, and Advanced B. At this point he told us to practice one series a day, and only once a day".






Syllabus

Available as pfd download from googledocs

--------------------

POSTS RELATED TO ASHTANGA HISTORY










Update - in the context of this post

Inappropriate adjustments
https://grimmly2007.blogspot.jp/2017/12/inappropriate-adjustments.html
































Saturday, 6 July 2013





































---------------------











No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: only a member of this blog may post a comment.

Follow by Email

Print

A Reminder

from Kalama sutra, translation from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi This blog included.

"So, as I said, Kalamas: 'Don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, "This contemplative is our teacher." When you know for yourselves that, "These qualities are unskillful; these qualities are blameworthy; these qualities are criticized by the wise; these qualities, when adopted & carried out, lead to harm & to suffering" — then you should abandon them.' Thus was it said. And in reference to this was it said.

"Now, Kalamas, don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, 'This contemplative is our teacher.' When you know for yourselves that, 'These qualities are skillful; these qualities are blameless; these qualities are praised by the wise; these qualities, when adopted & carried out, lead to welfare & to happiness' — then you should enter & remain in them. Buddha - Kalama Sutta

Labels

#proficientprimaryproject (1) 10 point way to health (1) 100 years of beatitude (1) 2nd series headstands (1) 2nd series list (1) 3rd edition Vinyasa Krama Practice Book (1) 7 deadlies. (1) 84 key asana (2) 8f key postures (1) A. G. Mohan (1) acro yoga (1) Advanced A B C D list (1) AG Mohan (2) Ajaan Lee (1) alternate breathing in ashtanga (1) alternatives to asana (1) alternatives to headstand (1) Angela Jamison (1) Ante-natel Yoga (3) Anthar Kumbhakam (1) Antharanga Sadhana (1) applied anatomy and physiology of yoga (1) Ardha Baddha Padma Paschimattanasana (1) Ardhomukhasvanasana (1) arm balances (1) asana lists (1) Asana madness (1) Ashtanga (3) Ashtanga Advanced series (1) ashtanga and age (1) ashtanga and ageing (1) Ashtanga as it was (2) ashtanga authorisation (1) Ashtanga breathing (1) Ashtanga certification (1) Ashtanga cheat sheets (1) Ashtanga history (2) Ashtanga illustrations (1) Ashtanga in midlife (1) Ashtanga intermediate (1) Ashtanga mysore (1) Ashtanga primary (1) Ashtanga primary series list (1) Ashtanga reading list (1) Ashtanga Rishi approach. (9) Ashtanga teacher Authorisation (1) Ashtanga vinyasa (2) Ashtanga Vinyasa Krama (1) Ashtanga Yoga (3) Ashtanga young boys (1) asymm (1) Asymmetric asana (1) AVIDYA (1) back bending (1) backbending (2) baddha konasana (1) badha matsyendrasana (1) badha padmasana (1) Bahauddin Dagar (1) Bandhas (6) Bansuri Holliger (t)air(e) for solo flute (1) Basti. Neti (1) beginner yoga reading list (1) bhagavad gita (1) Bhagavadagita (1) Bharadvajrasana (1) Bharadvajrasana long stay (1) Bharatanatyam (1) Bhaya Kumbakam (1) Bhoja's commentary on Yoga sutras (1) Bhuja Dandasana (1) Big people can do you (1) biography of Krishnamacharya (1) BNS Iyengar (2) bow (1) Bow sequence (5) breath holding (1) Breath of god (1) Breath of gods (1) Breath of the Gods (3) breathing asana (1) breathing in Ashtanga (1) Buddhasana (1) Burmese buddhism (1) Camel walk (2) caturanga Dandasana (1) chakea (1) Chakras (3) chakrasana (1) chanting in asana (1) Chanting the yoga sutras. (1) chanting yoga sutras (1) coming back to Ashtanga (1) comparison of drishti (1) Dasha diirgha rechaka puuraka (1) David Williams (1) Der Atmande Gott (1) Der Atmende gott (2) dhanurasana (2) Dharana (3) Dharana focal points (1) Dhouti (1) Dhouti kriya (1) Dhyana (3) Did Krishnamacharya speak English (1) Dido and Aeneas (1) Dido's lament (1) Do we need an Advanced series (1) drishti (5) Durvasasana (1) Dvipada sirsasana (1) dwi pada sirsasana (1) dwipadapitam (1) Early Ashtanga (1) Easter Krishnamacharya retreat (1) Eka pada raja Kapotasana (1) eka pada sirsasana (1) EKAPADA VIPARITAKARANI (1) Emergence du Yoga (1) Emergence of Yoga (4) Emurgence du Yoga (1) extended stays (2) FAT PEOPLE CAN'T DO YOGA? Fat people Can do Yoga (1) flute (1) Forest tradition (1) four Immeasurable and yoga (1) four Immeasurable and yoga sutras (1) full vinyasa (2) Ganda Bherundasana (1) Garbha Pindasana (1) getting in to full lotus (1) gita as it was (1) grimmly's retreat (1) grimmly's workshop (1) Guru's of Modern Yoga (1) halasana (1) handstands (1) hanumanasana (2) Hatha Yoga Pradipka (1) headstand (10) headstand variations (1) headstands (2) heart stopping (1) heart stopping experiment (1) hidden asana (1) History of Asana (1) History of Ashtanga (1) history of Yoga (1) House recommendations (2) how to breath in asana (1) how to chant the yoga sutras (1) How to do a headstand (1) how to do lotus (1) how to learn ashtanga (1) in defense of asana (1) Indian cosmology (3) Indian evolution (3) Indra Devi (1) Inner gazing (1) insight meditation (1) Intermediate series (1) internal drishti (2) inversions (3) inverted sequence (3) inverted subroutines (9) iyengar (1) Iyengar jumping (1) Iyengar practicing ashtanga (1) Iyengar. 1938 Krishnamacharya movie (3) Iyengar's ashtanga (1) jalandhara bandha (1) Jivatma (1) john Scott (1) Jump back jump through (5) jump back seven elements (7) Kapalabhati (1) Kapilasana (1) Kapotasana (1) Kausthub Desikachar (1) KPJAYI (1) Krishanacharya (2) Krishanamacharya (3) krishanamcharya and the big man (1) Krishnamacharya (84) Krishnamacharya and Buddhism (1) Krishnamacharya and Burmese Buddhism. (1) Krishnamacharya Biography (1) Krishnamacharya chanting (1) Krishnamacharya documentary (1) Krishnamacharya drishti (1) Krishnamacharya in colour (1) Krishnamacharya in Mysore (1) Krishnamacharya in Tibet (1) Krishnamacharya interview (1) Krishnamacharya movie (3) Krishnamacharya shoulder stands (1) Krishnamacharya teaching. (2) krishnamacharya. (1) Krishnamacharya's 32 headstands (1) Krishnamacharya's Advanced asana (1) krishnamacharya's Biography (1) Krishnamacharya's daughter (1) Krishnamacharya's early Mysore practice. (1) Krishnamacharya's early Mysore works (1) Krishnamacharya's English (1) Krishnamacharya's guru (1) Krishnamacharya's life saving practice (2) Krishnamacharya's Mysore Yoga students 1941 (1) Krishnamacharya's own practice (2) Krishnamacharya's personal practice (1) Krishnamacharya's practice (1) Krishnamacharya's pranayama (2) Krishnamacharya's pranayama practice (1) Krishnamacharya's second series (1) Krishnamacharya's sun salutation (1) krishnamacharya's Yoga Makaranda (1) Krishnamacharya's Yogasanagalu (2) Krishnamcharya (1) Kriya (1) Kumbhaka (10) Kumbhaka and healing (1) kumbhaka. (1) Lamrim (1) Langhana kriya (1) learn dance hand mudras (1) learning Ashtanga (1) learning original ashtanga (1) learning Sanskrit numbers (1) Learning Vinyasa Count (1) leg behind head (1) Leg behind head preparation postures (3) Life saving Yoga practice (1) lineage (1) Lino Miele (1) long stay asana (1) Long Stays in asana (2) lotus (2) Lotus lifted spun dropped. (1) lotus sequence (1) lotus subroutines (7) lotus to headstand (2) lout (1) loving kindness (1) Loving kindness and Yoga Sutras (2) maha vedha (1) mahabharata (1) mahamudra (1) Mahavedha (2) Mala Srivatsan (4) mandala (3) manju jois (2) Mantra pranayama (1) Marichiyasana G (1) Marichiyasana H (1) Mark Singleton (2) maya vedha (1) mayurasana (2) meaning of asana (1) meaning of yoga (1) meanings of Yoga (1) Meditation (4) Meditative (2) Meditative subroutines (6) Mindfulness (1) Mixed Mysore room (1) Mixed style Mysore room (1) Modern postural yoga (1) modified Ashtanga (1) moolabhnadha (2) mudra (4) Mudras (2) mula bandha (2) Mysore (1) Mysore Traditions Movie (1) Mysore yoga (1) Mysore yoga demonstration 1941 (1) Mysore yoga documentary (1) Mysore yoga film (1) Mysore yoga traditions film (1) Mysore yoga traditions retreat (1) Mysore yoga tradtidions (1) namarupa (4) Nancy Gilgoff (3) natajarasana (1) Nauli (1) newsletters (3) Nine bandhas (1) Niralumba sarvangasana (1) niralumba sirsasana (3) Norman Allen (1) Norman Sjoman (1) Notes to self (1) Old krishnamacharya pictures (1) Old man of hassan (1) origin of Ashtanga (1) original Ashtanga (3) original ashtanga syllabus (1) original bhagavad gita (1) Original sun salutation (2) original surynamaskara (1) origins of Ashtanga (2) origins of sun salutation (1) Outer gazing - Krishnamacharya (1) overweight (1) Padangustha Dhanurasana (1) padmasana (2) Paramata (1) pasasana (1) paschimottanasana (1) patanjali (1) Pattabhi Jois (5) Pattabhi Jois sexual assault allegations (1) pattabhi Jois. (2) Pattabhi Jois' (1) Philosophy (3) phulgenda Sinha (1) Playing flute in asana (1) practice guidelines (1) Practicing Vinyasa Krama (1) practicing yoga safely (1) practicing yoga when overweight (1) pranayama (9) pranayama in asana (2) pranayama mantra (1) Pratyahara (1) preparation for yoga (1) Presse Medicale 1936 (1) Primary series (1) proficiency in asana (1) puraka (1) Puraka (inhalation) (1) puraka kumbhaka (1) Purusha (3) Questions from krishnamacharya's students (1) Questions to krishnamacharya (1) Raja Bhoja (1) raja kapotasana (1) Rajah of Aundh (1) ram (1) Rama Mohana Brahmacari (1) Rama Mohana Brahmacharya (1) Ramamohana Brahmachari (1) ramaswam's newsletters vol 1 and vol 2 (1) Ramaswami (13) Ramaswami Interview (1) Ramaswami on Krishnamacharya (1) Ramaswami pranayama (1) ramaswami. (1) Ramaswami's Newsletters Vol 1-3 for Download (1) Ramaswami's Yoga sutra tutorial (1) Ramaswami's yoga sutras (1) Ramswami yoga (1) Reading list (1) Recaka (exhalation) (1) recaka kumbhaka (1) recheka (1) Relationships (1) returning to Ashtanga (1) reviews (1) richard freeman and Pattabhi Jois (1) Richard Schechner (2) rishi series (5) Safer yoga practice (1) Salutations to the Teacher and the Eternal one (4) Samadhi (1) Samaria gorge (1) Samkhya (4) Samkhya krika (1) Samyama (3) sanmukha mudra (1) Sanskrit numbers (1) sarvanagasana (6) sarvangasa (2) sarvangasana (3) sarvangasana preparation (1) sat mukhi mudra (1) say (3) Sayadaw (1) seated (2) sequences and subroutines. (88) shakuhachi (1) Shandor Remete (1) shanmukha mudra (1) Sharath jois (1) shoulder stand (1) shoulder stand vinyasas (3) shoulderstand (4) Shoulderstands. (1) Shribashyam (1) simhasana (2) Simon Borg-Oliver (6) Simon Borg-Olivier (1) sinha (1) sirsasana (12) Sirsasana variations (1) sirsasana. headstand (1) SIRSHASANA (1) Sisrasana (1) sitali suryabheda nadi shodana (1) Sonia Nelson (1) Spinal sequence (1) SRI T K SRIBHASHYAM (2) Sri TK Sribhashyam (1) Srivatsa Ramaswami (16) Srivatsa Ramaswami's (1) Srivatsan (1) steadiness and comfort ( sthhira and sukha). (1) studying with krishnamacharya (1) Subroutines. (2) Subtle body (1) Sun salutation (4) sun salutation mantras (1) sun salutation with mantra (1) sun salutation with mantras. Suryanamaskara (1) supine (1) supine Subroutines (18) Supoine (1) supta kurmasana (1) Suptapada Parsvangushtasana (1) Suptaparsva paddanguthasana (1) sury namaskara with mantras (1) surya namaskar (1) suryanamakara (1) Suryanamakara with mantras (1) surynamaskara (1) T. K. Shribashyam (3) T. K. Sribashyam (1) T.K. Sribhashyam (2) Table of asana (1) TAN postures (1) tatakamudra (2) tattvas samkhya (1) ten breaths in each asana (1) The 'Original' Ashtanga yoga Syllabus given to Nancy Gilgoff and David Williams by Sri K Pattabhi Jois in 1974 Mysore (1) the asana before the asana (1) the breath (1) The breathing God (4) The Complete Book of Vinyasa Yoga : Subroutines page numbers (1) The Four Immeasurables (1) The Indian Review (1) THE KALAMA SUTRA (1) the Original gita (2) the Original Yoga Sutras (2) The Purnacarya (1) The Viniyoga letter (1) This is yoga 1941 (1) This is yoga life magazine (1) tibet (1) Tirieng Mukha Eka Pada Paschimattanasana (1) Tirumular Thirumandiram (1) tittibhasana (1) TK Shribhsyam (1) TKV Desikachar (1) tradition (1) Trataka (1) Trikonasana (1) TRS Sharma (2) uddiyana bandha (2) uddiyana kriya (1) uddiyana mudra Kino (1) ujjayi (1) unsupported headstands (2) urdhva dhanurasana (1) Urdhvamukhasvanasana (1) ushtrasana (1) utthita parsvakonasana (1) vajrasana (1) Veena (1) Vinay Kumar (1) Vinyasa (1) Vinyasa count (2) Vinyasa Krama (11) Vinyasa Krama 200HR TT program (1) Vinyasa Krama practice routine (1) Vinyasa Krama practice sheets (1) Vinyasa Krama Sister blog (1) Vinyasa Krama speeded up Ashtanga slowed down (1) Vinyasa Krama triangle subroutines (7) Vinyasa Yoga (1) Viparita Salabhasana (1) vipassana (1) vipraita salambhasana (1) Virasana (1) Vital points (1) VK Asymmetric seated sequence (8) VK Bow sequence (1) VK Inverted sequence (1) VK Lotus sequence (1) VK On one leg sequence (7) VK On your feet sequence (2) VK Seated Sequence (7) VK supine sequence (1) When I'm laid in the Earth. (1) Why meditation (1) why practice mudras. (1) Why practice yoga (1) Why Yoga (1) Wildyogi (1) Yamini Murthanna (1) Yoga (4) yoga and ageing (1) Yoga and pregnancy (3) Yoga and weight (1) Yoga Body (1) Yoga for Diabetes (1) Yoga for the three stages of life (4) Yoga for women (1) Yoga Gurandam (1) Yoga Korunta (3) yoga korunti (1) Yoga Makaranda (10) Yoga makaranda ( part II) (1) Yoga makaranda asana list (1) Yoga Makaranda part 2 (1) Yoga Makaranda Part II (2) Yoga makaranda translation. (1) yoga makaranda. (1) Yoga Meditation (1) yoga mudras (1) Yoga Nidrasana (1) yoga of action (1) yoga of motion (1) Yoga Philosophy (5) Yoga raading list (1) Yoga Rainbow festival (1) Yoga Science (1) Yoga sutra 1:33 (1) Yoga Sutras (3) Yoga Sutras II-49 (1) Yoga Sutras transliteration (1) Yoga therapy articles (1) Yoga Therapy for Children with Special Needs (1) Yoga tradition of the Mysore palace (1) Yoga Vinyasa yoga (1) Yoga yajnavalkya (1) Yogacarya Krishnamacharya - The Purnacarya (2) Yogacarya Krishnamacharya - The Purnacarya. Edited by Mala (1) Yogakriyas (1) Yogasanagalu (32) Yogasanagalu asana list (1) yogasanagalu translation (4) Yogasanagalua (1) Yogayajnavalkya (1) Yogeshwara Ramamohana Brahmachari (1) Yvonne Millerand (2) Yyvonne milerand (1)